http://www.cbsnews.com/news/a-raging-son/

This was what a Harvard-educated forensic psychiatrist, Dr. Alexander Sasha Bardey, had to say about the “Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED)” on the May 10, 2014 episode of 48 Hours – “It’s a mental illness … characterized by bouts of loss of control and bouts of anger and bouts of violence.” Even though Jason Bohn had viciously murdered his girlfriend, Danielle Thomas, his defense argued that he should be charged with manslaughter and not murder because he suffered from IED. He had suffered abuse as a child, and had been abandoned/ neglected by his mother. In the end, the jury found him guilty of first degree murder.

As I watched the episode, several questions ran through my head including the following:

This was what a Harvard-educated forensic psychiatrist, Dr. Alexander Sasha Bardey, had to say about the “Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED)” on the May 10, 2014 episode of 48 Hours – “It’s a mental illness … characterized by bouts of loss of control and bouts of anger and bouts of violence.” Even though Jason Bohn had viciously murdered his girlfriend, Danielle Thomas, his defense argued that he should be charged with manslaughter and not murder because he suffered from IED. He had suffered abuse as a child, and had been abandoned/ neglected by his mother. In the end, the jury found him guilty of first degree murder.

As I watched the episode, several questions ran through my head including the following:

Jason spent some of his youth years in group homes. How many others from those group homes with similar experiences like his have gone ahead to kill their intimate partner, and did so in a prolonged manner?

Jason has IED. Why didn’t he kill his boss, his colleague, his professor, his neighbor – even his mother? Is the murderous rage of IED reserved only for intimate partners?

Why did it have to take Danielle’s murder to get an IED diagnosis? Didn’t his behavior before Danielle’s murder bother him or anyone? If it did, why did he not get an assessment earlier? When he beat up Danielle the time the neighbor called the police, didn’t he find that strange? Should he not have gone to get help, and reported his behavior as troubling? Or was a diagnosis only important for a murder defense, and not to get professional help?

That part of wedding vows that says, “Until death do us part,” is actually supposed to mean until a party dies of natural causes. When one party’s physical, emotional and mental well-being is compromised, then separation or divorce can do the parting. In my opinion, a person with grave concerns about being “abandoned” should stay away from intimate relationships – especially if they have issues with power and control. That person who would really have spent the rest of their life with you may be less inclined to do so when being with you redefines who they knew themselves to be, to become a poor caricature of their true self.

If you have IED and can refrain from killing the people with whom you do not have an intimate relationship, endeavor to extend that same self-control to the person who makes a choice to be intimate with you out of the goodness of their heart.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *